Carolingian Minuscule

I came to a lovely realization two nights ago: I actually like my handwriting.  As a child, I would see friends’ beautiful cursive or fun, bubbly letters, or even the irregular, artsy print of my friend Jana, and be envious that my hands seemed incapable of producing anything but boy writing.  Lord, could you just…make this pretty? I would pray.
My mom gave me a couple of tubs full of school papers to go through when she was down in March, and I finally completed the task in June (I know, aren’t I efficient?).  It was fun to see kindergarten craft projects, dripping in glitter and cotton balls, juxtaposed with high school notebooks, filled with stickers and notes to friends.  And the college notebooks, with margins jam-packed with doodles (doodlers retain more information; did you know?) and pages of things that I will never remember and never need to remember.  Why did my mom save so much stuff?  I will never know.  I tossed about 9/10 of it, only saving “special” items, like my poetry, short stories, and newspaper articles of which I was especially proud.
Anyway, back to my point.  It still pained me to look at my elementary and high school printing.  My cursive has always been (still is) ugly, but the only time I utilize it is in writing cheques.  (Why must cheques be written in cursive? Is it some sort of law?)
While penning some thoughts in my prayer journal this weekend, however, I paused and looked at the page.  Hmmm…I thought, I actually don’t mind how my writing looks!  How novel!  After all these years!
How about you?  Do you like your handwriting/printing?  Why or why not?  Which do you use?  And if you don’t mind my asking, in which decade did you graduate?  I find that most people age 40ish and younger print, while those older still often use cursive (there are exceptions, of course).
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11 thoughts on “Carolingian Minuscule

  1. I like my cursive, although my mom claims it’s illegible (she’s the only complaint I have regarding this, so I don’t take her seriously). I have horrible printing, unless I’m “teacher writing” with the 3-lined writing tablets. I typically write in cursive, and I graduated 1999.

  2. I used to like my writing, and then I started College. Manual Drafting and Architectural Text was my new lingo so hence, my nice curvy writing became very purposeful and perfect (let me tell you, if it didnt look mechanical you were in TROUBLE!). Since I have left the design part of my life behind me (good riddens!) I have been trying to come back into my own. Only most often the combination of cursive and drafting is not so pretty. I do not write in cursive at all – other than my signature – which most recently just became more cursive. For years my signature was all caps in script.

    Some day I hope to be able to say the same! 🙂

  3. I love my writing. I write big, everyone says so, but I was a preschool teacher before kids and I think that’s in my blood. I guess I write like a teacher, that’s what people have told me. I almost never write in cursive, I just use it to sign my name. I’m a printer. The one year I taught 7-8th grade I had to write in cursive (as my students did) and I found myself more than once looking at the cursive alphabet at the top of the room to figure out a letter. I graduated high school in 1995 (Chaska High), and college (Concordia St. Paul) in 1999.

  4. The problem I’ve always had with my handwriting was that it changes style without my say-so. I’m not sure where the message between my brain and my hand goes astray, but it can look completely different from one week to the next; now long and slanting to the left, now round and low and slanting to the right, now loopy and small and not slanting in either direction. That I couldn’t seem to keep a “signature” handwriting used to chafe me, but I’ve made peace with it.

    I do print sometimes, but most of the time–whatever my handwriting du jour–it is something between printing and cursive. (And I’m 29). And I can do a decent job of imitating any handwriting I see with reasonable accuracy (I know this, because often in my younger years I’d see a handwriting I liked and copy it, vowing that my handwriting would stop changing form.) Maybe I missed my calling, and instead of being a stay at home mom, I should be living a life of crime, forging checks. 😉

  5. I LOVE my handwriting, both my print & my cursive. Unfortunately, I have spent an EMBARRASSING amount of time practicing! I’m a school teacher, so I had to make writing on the chalkboard perfect while I was in college. Only to have my chalk/white board made obsolete in my second year of teaching..nice. I still have very neat & meticulous “teacher” handwriting. If I’m making lists & stuff around home I write in print, if I’m writing a letter or in my journal I write in cursive. I ALWAYS write in cursive in my journal.

  6. Interesting . . . I ALWAYS print checks (all capital letters), and only write my signature in cursive. Of course, I only write about 10 checks a year now that we do everything online.

    I often prefer printing, but if I need to write quickly or be “grown up” (e.g., thank-you notes), I do use cursive. Most of the time I like my handwriting, but I have good and bad days–sometimes my hand just doesn’t want to work nicely with my brain.

    I graduated high school in 1987, so I’m right on the cusp of the printers/handwriters cutoff. 🙂

  7. I do the combination printing/cursive when I write. I seem to like the style of my indidual words, but then when I’m done writing a card or address on an envelope, I see that each word takes on a slightly different style, and because of that it looks inconsistent and messy. I was born in 1980, so I’m almost 28.

  8. LOL, your post made me laugh. Because I hated my handwriting all the way through school, and I love it now. And I do this weird hybrid of cursive and print that makes my husband worry when he thinks about me homeschooling and teaching our kids to write. But he also likes it, because as he says, ‘It’s girly without being all cheerleader-y and stupid with all those dumb little animals they draw.’ (Methinks he dated a cheerleader in high school and hated the notes he got from her! lol!!)

    I would have graduated in 2001 … if I had chosen to graduate. Which I didn’t. And I agree about the age thing, but I’ve found it’s becoming more like the 50+ crowd is cursive, and younger is either print, or the hybrid thing that a lot of us seem to do.

    ~Brea

  9. Love my own handwriting. And my husband’s even more. We’ve been told we have “pinhead writing.”

    It is very small.

    My mom says that small handwriting is either a sign of intelligence or insecurity.

    I’d like to think the former…

  10. I have a love-hate relationship with my writing. Some days I’m okay with it, other days *shudder* it’s awful! I like how I used to write better, but it’s too late, the morph has occurred and it’s a pretty solid combination of printing and cursive. Grad was ’97 for me. I hear they teach some new style of writing now with cursive – it integrates more printing. And why is it called cursive anyway?

  11. I think part of the reason is now a days we aren’t being taught cursive in school. I will be graduating in 2015and I was never taught cursive or anything near it I have barely mastered my name and that’s all I will be attempting haha but weirdly enough my writing is cursive and block… I think the reason for so many of us having hybrid writing is from mimicking our parents when they wrote and then going to school and having to follow the teachers directions so you get a mix between your moms (because I used to copy every thing my mom would write what little girl didn’t?) and what you have to know in school. Another reason is that you used tohave to write in cursive but now it’s perfectly fine for you to write block as cursive… In fact I am learning that many teachers prefer it. I find it extremely funny when people judge others by their handwriting they can be so misled hahaha I hope I learn to love my writing because right now I hate it!!!

    Tristen <3~

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